Young Adults

An Embarrassment of Community Riches

This past week here Boston Workmen’s Circle offered a wide variety of programs that showcased the wonderful diversity of our community, from Shule to a Shabes dinner to a discussion of solidarity and mutual aid. Read all about it!

First Night! Boston Workmen's Circle Radical Hanukkah Party

Johnny D's Uptown, Davis Square, Somerville, MA
 
 
With a special late show featuring HONK!

Job Opportunities

We have multiple open positions at BWC, see below for details:

1.

Costumes Meet Community at Gragger!

Gragger! brought together over 300 people on Saturday for a night of joyous revelry and political community. For the fifth straight year, our radical Purim party attracted a multigenerational crowd eager to “boo” at the appropriate times and dance until the wee hours of the morning. 

Strike! Celebrating the 100th Anniversary of Bread & Roses

“Short pay, all out!” That was the rallying cry of Lawrence textile workers in 1912. We celebrate the history of the strike and honor today's ongoing labor struggles with a series of spring events.

Projects & Workshops

When the economic crisis hit in 2008, young adults gathered for a series of living room conversations. We talked about how the economic crisis was affecting us, and we talked about how we want to respond to it as a community. Since then, we have worked to build Boston Workmen's Circle as a radical mutual aid society for today – a place where we can help each other to live more sustainable, communal, and thoughtful lives.

Want to get involved? Contact simcha@circleboston.org, or call 617-566-6281.

3rd Night! A Radical Hanukkah Dance Party

All Asia, 334 Mass Ave, Cambridge (near Central Square)

The Workmen's Circle invites you to the latest incarnation of our annual, radical Hanukkah celebration - a dance party!  Featuring:

Shabbat as Resistance and Refuge: A Young Adult Shabes Dinner and Discussion

36 Elm Street, Jamaica Plain

Join us for a discussion about how shabes offers us a model for resisting the pressures and injustices of our modern economic system. We will use the ideas of Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel, a theologan and social justice activist, as a springboard for discussion. 

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